New Old 1909 Postcard Winslow, Indiana

I just can’t stand to see these things on Ebay and not buy them.

This is a 1909 Street Scene in Winslow.  I think it might be my street.  East Center Street.

Street Scene, Winslow, Indiana 1909 #16

Street Scene, Winslow, Indiana,  #16

The reason I think it might be my street is because of looking at the old Commercial Hotel picture John Dedman posted on his Winslow Eskimo site it looks like it might be the same building from the other angle.

The Commercial Hotel, Center Street, Winslow, Indiana

The Commercial Hotel, Center Street, Winslow, Indiana

Or it could be somewhere else in town.  Maybe even Main Street.

winslow1113-001

There was a streetlight.

Back of card

Back of card

Someone wanted to have chocolate pie with Clellia Skinner.

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Mac’s Cafe on Main Street in Winslow

My grandma, Barbara Bolin Evans,  had fond memories of working at Mac’s Café.  She used to walk from Muren to Winslow into work. My Grandpa Evans always told the story about how when he first met her she was walking to work in the winter without a coat.  He said the first thing he did when they started dating was buy her a winter coat.

She was close to the Dedman and McCord families back then, who ran the cafe.  She remembered John David and Mary Jane Dedman Smith as children growing up there.  I asked John David to share a little history of the store with me.  John David Dedman runs the Winslow Eskimo website at www.jddedman.com.  He worked for years as a postal clerk in Winslow and has some good stories to share.

Mac's Cafe, Main Street Winslow, about 1956

Mac’s Cafe, Main Street Winslow, about 1956.  Where the bank parking lot is now.

“At one time back in the 50’s, there was a Marathon gas station on the corner just south of the restaurant and there was a big sign out front that said “Mac’s Café”.  Actually it was a tavern but they did have a fairly good food business, especially sandwiches.

The tavern burned in either 57 or 58 and was a total loss.   The building was owned by Harcourt Scales and was not re-built after the fire.   Someone had broken in to the tavern to steal things and torched it to cover up the break in.

Attached is a picture I had of the inside of the restaurant and I think it is dated 1952.   The lady to the far left is Sarah McCord, my grandmother and I am sure the waitress is Barbara, your grandmother.   I think the man drinking the beer could have been Pap Dorsey and the man sitting behind him reminds me of John Hunley.   I cannot think of the names of the lady and man sitting at the bar but they were frequent guests in there.

I have this picture up on my web site at http://www.jddedman.com.   The juke box is one of those old rare Seeberg record players, and then they had a bumper pool table.  Later they put in a shuffle board and a TV.   The kitchen was on the back left side and the door on the right was to men’s restroom, the ladies room was closer to the kitchen.   One time in the mid 40’s they had slot machines that sat around the restroom door and along the wall.   I remember on VE-D in 1945 after the end of the Japan war, I hit the jackpot on the 10 cent slot machine.  It was not long after that the slots were taken out, and buried as it was becoming illegal to have them.”

Mac's Cafe, 1952.

Mac’s Cafe, 1952.

I had shared this picture with my grandma and she agreed she was the waitress.  She remembered that old plaid dress.

“ After the tavern burnt, the John Russ Insurance Agency re-built it and had their insurance office there for several years.   John Russ, Herbert Russ and Basil Thompson worked there.   At one time, John let us use the back part of his office for amateur radio meetings which we held every month on a Monday night for a long time.   I was a licensed ham, as well as Basil, and Herb wanted to get a license but never did.   Ernie Hume and his wife and son did get a ham license. “

My grandma told me that she had a picture of Pearl and the store somewhere too.  We found it one day in a box in the old cupboard in her bedroom.  I shared it with John who told me about the picture.

The McCord at Mac's Cafe.

The McCord’s at Mac’s Cafe.

“The photo you sent me was of Pearl B. McCord and his wife, Sarah E. McCord.  They were the owners of Mac’s Café which was located at the location where the Citizens State Bank (German American) now sits.   Pearl was my mother’s father and at one time in the early 30’s was Postmaster at Winslow Post Office.   My actual grandmother – Audie, died when my mother was only 12 years old and Pearl married Sarah a few years later and they lived in the house down from you on Center Street where Jerry and Mary Jane lived for years..

I had lived in the same house from about 1958 until 1963 when I moved to Evansville, then Mary & Jerry moved in there.

My grandfather had a large roll top desk sitting where you see them in the picture and he did his book work there and it was where he could see the bar and kitchen.  After the fire, the only thing that was saved was the desk and I ended up with it myself.  I had to take off the roll-top as it was damaged too much, but the rest was okay and I used it for years while I was living in Winslow. “

Summertime Drive In Memories

Whenever you enter Winslow from the North side, you will see this old neon sign from the Sunset Drive In that formerly stood on Highway 41 in Evansville.  The screen is set up back in the distance.  It is summertime nostalgia for me.  I called it the Airport Drive In.

Moved north of Winslow:  the old Sunset Drive In

Moved north of Winslow: the old Sunset Drive In

I know there once was the intention of opening a drive in here.  Now it is an abandoned roadside attraction of a day gone by.  It could just as easily have been laying in a landfill somewhere.   I like that it is sitting there.  You may see old junk sitting in weeds, but I see childhood memories.

Growing up in the 1960’s, going to the drive in on the weekends was the thing to do with our family.  We went to Oakland City Drive In mostly.  But once in a while we would go to the Sunset Drive In, all the way to Evansville.  The entire experience was just a big treat.  For one thing, we rarely went to the city at night.   I still love a city at night.  The first thrilling thing for me was driving past the airport with all of it’s colored lights.  If a plane was taking off or landing, we kids would hang all over the top of each other to look out the window busting with sheer excitement.  We weren’t in seatbelts back then.  Remember hanging over the front seat and your dad yelling at you to quit hanging over the seat?  We would drive past Dad’s work, that big bustling Whirlpool factory was bigger than anything in Winslow.  Then we were there, pulling in past the glowing light of the Sunset Drive In sign.

The Sunset Drive In.  Evansville, Indiana http://www.courierpress.com/

The Sunset Drive In. Evansville, Indiana.   http://www.courierpress.com/

At the Oakland City Drive In we kids pretty much could run around by ourselves.  But here Momma was a little more cautious with that.  We still could go up and play on the playground that was under the big screen under her watchful eye.  Dusk would turn into darkness and the cartoons would start.   Woody Woodpecker was our cue to abandon the swings and seesaws up front and head back to the car. Sometimes we had to look twice because Dad would have moved the car if the speaker didn’t work.  We would make a trip to the bathroom, Momma taking me, Dad taking the boys.  Cars were so much bigger back then.   Momma would put pillows in the floorboard on either side of the hump, making the entire backseat a big bed for me and my two little brothers.  Usually we lay down after the cartoons.  Sometimes I would climb up in the back window….in those old big cars the back window had a ledge that was perfect for little girls to share with the nodding dog and look out at the stars overhead.  At Oakland City when I lay in the back window all I could see were stars, here there were planes flying over my head with their blinking lights to dream by.

Memories of family drives, city lights, concessions stand bathrooms, crackly speakers, mosquito coils hanging on the window, just getting a few sips out of one pop for the entire family to share, just getting a few bites out of one popcorn for the entire family to share, the smell of Dad’s cigarettes, seeing my parents sitting next to each other with Dad’s arm around Momma, jostling around with my little brothers as we lay down to sleep and a hot summer night somehow seem a whole lot sweeter than that click of a button for that movie in my living room.

Memorial Day 2013: A Patriotic Story & A Parade

I was glad to be working third shift today so that I could attend the Annual Memorial Day Parade in Winslow this afternoon at 2:00 pm.   I also saw this heart tugging story of Winslow High School sweethearts during the 1940’s WWII on Fox News.

This is the story on Fox News:

“Laura Mae Davis Burlingame — she married an Army Air Corps man in 1945 — had gone to the New Orleans museum on April 24 looking for a display commemorating the young Marine who had been her high-school sweetheart.

“I figured I’d see pictures of him and the fellows he’d served with and articles about where he served,” she said.

She was stunned to find the diary of the 22-year-old machine gunner.

Curator Eric Rivet let her take a closer look, using white gloves to protect the old papers from skin oils. It was the first time in his 17 years of museum work that someone found “themselves mentioned in an artifact in the museum,” Rivet said.

The diary was a gift to Jones from Davis. They had met in the class of ’41 at Winslow High School. “He was a basketball player and I was a cheerleader,” she said.”

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/05/27/high-school-sweetheart-finds-killed-wwii-marine-diary-in-museum-70-years-later/?intcmp=trending#ixzz2UWF2G4AJ

I was disappointed to see the Main Street so empty of citizens honoring those who have paid the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom in this country.  I know what that Main Street looks like during a Little League parade.  Wouldn’t you think even more people would turn out for this parade?

Most of us had fathers and grandfathers who fought in a war.  Several of us still have sons, grandsons and husbands fighting in the current wars.  I know several people are honoring the war dead in other places.  God bless them all.  We must remember to be patriotic and hold Memorial Day in our hearts as it was intended to be.

South Main Street during the Memorial Day Parade

South Main Street during the Memorial Day Parade

North Main Street during the Memorial Day Parade

North Main Street during the Memorial Day Parade

Honoring those who've gone before

Honoring those who’ve gone before

Honoring those who've gone before.

Honoring those who’ve gone before.

Patriotic golf carts & citizens

Patriotic golf carts & citizens

Children being patriotic

Children being patriotic

Museum of The Coal Industry

We will travel hundreds of miles and use up those hard earned vacation hours to explore places, when we tend to ignore the places to explore in our own backyards.

The Museum of the Coal Industry  in Lynnville, Indiana is one such place for me.  For years people kept telling me I had to go there.  I always said, I will, I will.  Because it’s just right there I will do that someday.  Then more months would go by before I would even think of it again.

My friend Amber and I were out rambling around on backroads one day and I asked her if she would like to see it.  We made the plan, emailed Aja Mason and set it up.  We had about 3 hours to spend there.

I did not realize I would need the entire day to see everything I wanted to see and to hear everything I wanted to hear.

I am for sure going back and it won’t be months from now.

If you are interested in coal mine history you must visit there.  You might see your Grandpa’s name in a ledger showing what he made and what he owed the company store.  You might find your dad’s hard hat hanging on the wall.  You might see pictures of your ancestors or old home places that no longer are around.  You might see gadgets that open your eyes to how hard the work was for a coal miner in the old days.

Aja knew my interest was in the Muren area and he had this photo for me.  It was from an album titled “Bad Hair Days”.   And believe me, some of them were!

A coal bucket flooded in at the Muren Mine Pit.  1940

A coal shovel flooded in at the Muren Mine Pit. 1940.  I bet there was some cussing this day.

When you have one of these lovely spring or summer days open and feel like doing something close to home I suggest you check it out.

http://www.lynnvillecoalmuseum.org/

I bet if you emailed Aja ahead of time and told him when you would be there, who and what you were interested in, he would have something picked out to show you when you got there.

He knows the history of everything there and he can tell a story to go along with it.

It’s well worth the visit.